Silent Muse

London-based illustrator Ruben Ireland fancies creating images that carry a certain emotional weight and relate to daily life. His images have a somber, emotional character to it. You can’t help but feel the wonder, sadness and perhaps loneliness that he portrays in his female muses. I’m no art analyst or critic, but his choice of color really dictates the type of emotion that each print conveys. I love his work. It’s dreamy, yet dark, like a sad nightmare.

Ireland’s women are like Audrey Kawasaki‘s girls, who took a wrong turn down a dark forest and became these hauntingly mysterious female warriors. (Well, Ireland is also not as erotic as Kawasaki.) I love his use of nature and indian references – it makes it relevant to today’s Native American trend.

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To captivate with a ballpoint pen

It’s not often you come across art that speaks to you. I love artists that use simple, ordinary mediums to create little mind-bending masterpieces. Take those of Calcutta born artist Nina Chakrabarti. She uses ballpoint pens, felt tips, and pencils to transform regular photos of models into exotic and almost haunting prints of “voodoo queens.” For the last two images, Chakrabarti goes for the whimsical effect, using paint and pens to create pretty and colorful details.

Chakrabarti currently lives in London and collaborates with various publications to produce unique alternatives to fashion editorials.

London artist Peggy Wolf

I’m a regular on Etsy. I scour the pages of handmade and vintage accessories until my eyes are on the verge of bleeding at 2:35 in the morning. The most recent things I’ve favorited are the fashion illustration-esque prints of London artist Peggy Wolf. ImageImageImageImage

You can purchase her prints or view her complete and stunning porfolio at PeggyWolf.com